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Truth is in favor of you and me; for the truth of our enemies whom we have been serving here in the U.S.A. for over 400 years (whom we did not know to be our enemies by nature) is the truth that the Black Man must have knowledge of to be able to keep from falling into the deceiving traps that are being laid by our enemies to catch us in their way which is opposed to the way of righteous of whom we are members. ~ The Honorable Elijah Muhammad

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Two in five African-American women know a prisoner, according to study

The research, led by University of Washington associate
professor of sociology Hedwig Lee '03 and co-authored by Cornell
associate professor of policy analysis and management Christopher
Wildeman, shows further
wrought by the U.S. prison boom, with potentially harmful consequences
to families and communities lacking social supports to raise children
and manage households.


The article, in Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, analyzes data from the 2006 General Social Survey to examine blacks and whites' self-reported ties to acquaintances, , neighbors or people they trust in state or federal prison. The data tell a grim story:


  • 44 percent of black women and 32 percent of have a family member in prison, compared to 12 percent of white women and 6 percent of white men;
  • Black
    women are far more likely to have an acquaintance (35 percent vs. 15
    percent), family member (44 percent vs. 12 percent), neighbor (22
    percent vs. 4 percent) or someone they trust (17 percent vs. 5 percent)
    in prison than are white women;
  • On average, black men report
    having 17 confidants and white men 688 acquaintances, yet black men are
    far more likely to have a confidant in prison than white men are to have
    even one acquaintance imprisoned.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-african-american-women-prisoner.html#jCp
The research, led by University of Washington associate
professor of sociology Hedwig Lee '03 and co-authored by Cornell
associate professor of policy analysis and management Christopher
Wildeman, shows further
wrought by the U.S. prison boom, with potentially harmful consequences
to families and communities lacking social supports to raise children
and manage households.


The article, in Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, analyzes data from the 2006 General Social Survey to examine blacks and whites' self-reported ties to acquaintances, , neighbors or people they trust in state or federal prison. The data tell a grim story:


  • 44 percent of black women and 32 percent of have a family member in prison, compared to 12 percent of white women and 6 percent of white men;
  • Black
    women are far more likely to have an acquaintance (35 percent vs. 15
    percent), family member (44 percent vs. 12 percent), neighbor (22
    percent vs. 4 percent) or someone they trust (17 percent vs. 5 percent)
    in prison than are white women;
  • On average, black men report
    having 17 confidants and white men 688 acquaintances, yet black men are
    far more likely to have a confidant in prison than white men are to have
    even one acquaintance imprisoned.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-african-american-women-prisoner.html#jCp
The research, led by University of Washington associate
professor of sociology Hedwig Lee '03 and co-authored by Cornell
associate professor of policy analysis and management Christopher
Wildeman, shows further
wrought by the U.S. prison boom, with potentially harmful consequences
to families and communities lacking social supports to raise children
and manage households.


The article, in Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, analyzes data from the 2006 General Social Survey to examine blacks and whites' self-reported ties to acquaintances, , neighbors or people they trust in state or federal prison. The data tell a grim story:


  • 44 percent of black women and 32 percent of have a family member in prison, compared to 12 percent of white women and 6 percent of white men;
  • Black
    women are far more likely to have an acquaintance (35 percent vs. 15
    percent), family member (44 percent vs. 12 percent), neighbor (22
    percent vs. 4 percent) or someone they trust (17 percent vs. 5 percent)
    in prison than are white women;
  • On average, black men report
    having 17 confidants and white men 688 acquaintances, yet black men are
    far more likely to have a confidant in prison than white men are to have
    even one acquaintance imprisoned.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-06-african-american-women-prisoner.html#jCp
The research, led by University of Washington associate professor of
sociology Hedwig Lee '03 and co-authored by Cornell associate professor
of policy analysis and management Christopher Wildeman, shows further
wrought by the U.S. prison boom, with potentially harmful consequences
to families and communities lacking social supports to raise children
and manage households.



The article, in Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, analyzes data from the 2006 General Social Survey to examine blacks and whites' self-reported ties to acquaintances, , neighbors or people they trust in state or federal prison. The data tell a grim story:

  • 44 percent of black women and 32 percent of have a family member in prison, compared to 12 percent of white women and 6 percent of white men;
  • Black
    women are far more likely to have an acquaintance (35 percent vs. 15
    percent), family member (44 percent vs. 12 percent), neighbor (22
    percent vs. 4 percent) or someone they trust (17 percent vs. 5 percent)
    in prison than are white women;
  • On average, black men report
    having 17 confidants and white men 688 acquaintances, yet black men are
    far more likely to have a confidant in prison than white men are to have
    even one acquaintance imprisoned.  Read more...

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