With just $0.05 a day, this Blueprint will make us strong, firm warriors in the battle to end poverty-->

Truth is in favor of you and me; for the truth of our enemies whom we have been serving here in the U.S.A. for over 400 years (whom we did not know to be our enemies by nature) is the truth that the Black Man must have knowledge of to be able to keep from falling into the deceiving traps that are being laid by our enemies to catch us in their way which is opposed to the way of righteous of whom we are members. ~ The Honorable Elijah Muhammad

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

6 Shocking Facts About Slavery, Natives and African Americans

In the last week of September, the Joseph Jenkins Roberts Center at Norfolk State University (NSU) held a conference called “1619: The Making of America.” That year is historically significant because it was the first year Africans were brought to the colonies and it was the year America’s first legislative body was founded.

In an admirable gesture to honor all of the cultural relations happening in the America’s in 1619, NSU hosted several Native speakers and those familiar with Native history to address many issues not often covered in today’s classrooms. During these sessions, many little known facts about African Americans, Native Americans and slavery were addressed in the years following 1619.

The Term Negro May Have Been Meant For American Indians

During the session “Native Americans at 1619” Dr. Arica Coleman, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware who is of Rappahannock and African American descent, discussed how the term negro might actually be referring to an American Indian.

 

According to her latest book, That the Blood Stay Pure, the term's origins can be traced to medieval Italy where it was a classification of a skin color, not race. Additionally, Europeans often referred to indigenous populations of their communities as negroes. In the Portuguese colony of Brazil, Indians were called negros da terra meaning negroes of the land.

Coleman pointed out during the conference that the early Virginia legislature identified Moors and negroes separately. There is also documentation in which individuals were described as “Negro African.” Coleman questioned why the two words would be used to describe an African person and suggested the Native meaning as a strong possibility.

1619 Might Not Be the Right Year

Dr. Coleman also asserts the year 1619 isn’t entirely correct regarding the first arrival of blacks to America. She notes “negroes” accompanied Spanish North American expeditions a century before the English arrived in Virginia.

She also cites evidence of cohabitation with aborigines in the early 17th century. She says that in 1603, seven negroes escaped from St. Augustine, maintained their freedom and married Indian women.  - ICTMN.com

 

DISCLAIMER

Know4LIFE's Raw Info. is a blog designed to bring alternative news and information that is relevant to the Black and disadvantaged communities. As such, any and all views and opinions expressed herein, regardless of authorship, do not represent the views or opinions of any author's employer or people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be related to or affiliated with unless explicitly stated otherwise. Raw Info. includes links to other sites/blogs operated by third parties. These links are provided for convenience and informational purposes only. As such, the information, opinions, products, and/or services contained therein do not reflect the views and opinions of or represent endorsement Know4LIFE. All images that appear on Raw Info. are under the copyright of their respective owners. Know4LIFE does not claim credit for any image unless explicitly stated. If you own the rights to any image appearing on Raw Info. and do not wish for it to appear, please notify Know4LIFE immediately and the image shall be promptly removed.